EXIT

The Bicycle Site Searchable Databases

Table: Articles, Tech, Tips  Export to CSV

 Search
  Show all 
    

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11-17  Next  Last       Records 1 to 20 of 337     
Page Size 
 
category (*)
title (*)
description (*)
View
Basics
Our Bicycling 101 articles are a collection of the basics of bicycles, parts, fitting, and riding. They're what you wish you had in front of you when you started cycling in the first place, and they make good sense. That sense isn't common these days, because bicycles haven't gotten steadily better - more often than not, the trend is that they've become steadily cheaper to make.
View
Basics
Should your new bike be road, mountain, cyclocross, or (yech!) a hybrid? Get the latest reviews and information to choose between products and technologies. From brake pads to fabrics to forks, everyone from casual buyers to hardcore tech-heads can keep up with what's hot, and if you should buy now.
View
Repair & Maintenance
Don’t stop and get all greasy putting the chain back on by hand. Instead, pedal very gently and use your shift lever to simply shift the chain back on.
View
Repair & Maintenance
Everything you need to understand from A to Z.
When appropriate, the definitions are crossed linked to other definitions
Sample from web site on Shifters: The hand control for a gear shifting system. I used to object to this term, because it is actually the derailer or the internal hub that does the real shifting, and the part commonly called the "shifter" is only the control mechanism. I preferred the term "shift lever". Since the increased popularity of twist-grip type controls, which are not levers, I have reluctantly come to accept the common usage of the term "shifter" to refer to the hand control.


View
Repair & Maintenance

Over a dozen how-to articles in hopes that it’ll help you achieve all your wrenching needs and goals. Quick Releases Explained, Removing A Rear Wheel, Basic Bike Care, Wheelbuilding: Lacing, Truing and Tensioning and a lot more.

One of the coolest things about bicycles is that they’re darn easy to fix; fun to fix, too. Everything’s right there, easy to see and figure out. With basic hand tools you might already have around the house, you can make many common repairs. Just by riding the bike, you can usually diagnose problems. And, with a little practice, even advanced bicycle repair such as wheelbuilding is well within your reach... continued

View
Equipment
Campagnolo was the manufacturer that invented derailleurs, and Shimano is the company that nowadays dominates the bicycle market with iron hand.
   This results in a war where each little movement of the enemy requires an in mediate response. And as always happens in wars, everybody has to take party.
   We will try to be impartial, and establish a true comparative between the flag ships of both contenders. by: David Diaz Blanco
View
Equipment
Choosing a comfortable bike saddle is about a lot more than the brand. Read on to learn about the features you need to consider when selecting a saddle for your bike.
View
Equipment

Shimano & Campagnolo Schematics. Repair guides for flat tire, front and rear derailleur, headset and emergency repairs.

Shimano Total Information -- Service manuals and information for Shimano components

Shimano Schematics -- Technical schematics from Shimano

Suntour Schematics -- Technical schematics from Suntour

Campagnolo Schematics -- Technical schematics from Campagnolo

View
Aches & Pains

Even with a correct fit, for you and your style, long climbs can make anyone's back hurt. The muscles of the low back work harder during seated climbing as they provide support for the trunk (much as strong abdominals are needed for aggressive cycling).

Question: "I'm training for RAMROD, a one-day event in Washington state. It covers 155 miles with three major climbs totaling 10,000 feet of vertical gain. My weekend training ride includes a tough climb of 6,000 feet that I've done all-out for three weeks. Now the nerves in my lower back are inflamed and I'm in pain even on the flats. I've had an expert bike fit, so bad position isn't the cause. What's the solution?" -- Jacques G.

Answer: Bike fit is usually the cause when long climbs produce back pain. However, there are lots of "correct" fits. Some are more aggressive than others (lower handlebar, higher saddle) and are more likely to make your back hurt. So the first thing to check is that your "fitter" didn't go too far in that direction.

Even with a correct fit (for you and your style), long climbs can make anyone's back hurt. The muscles of the low back work harder during seated climbing as they provide support for the trunk (much as strong abdominals are needed for aggressive cycling). Usually, climbing during training will make them stronger. You have been doing too much climbing, for your level of training, and gotten ahead of the curve for your back muscles adaptation. The solution would be to cut back on your training expectations and stop hammering yourself before the event. Climb a bit less, and don't go all out ... more

View
Training
During a typical day of doing nothing but living, you breathe in 15,000 liters of air-about 6 to 10 liters every minute.

Most of it comes through your nose, which is equipped with little filtering hairs to clean air en route to the lungs. Hop on your bike and start hauling down the road and your air intake increases at least tenfold-twentyfold if you're a hammer. And most of that air is getting pulled right through your mouth--sans filtering--into your lungs.

"That means you're taking in at least 10 times as many lung irritants, such as pollen and pollution," says Alfred Munzer, M.D., past president of the American Lung Association.
View
Training
The best training for climbing is to climb.

However, don't start training in hilly terrain until you have accumulated 1,200 - 1,500 flat miles. Then start on short hills and work your way into longer and steeper climbs. All early season hills should be done with a steady rhythm rather than jumps. Don't jump, slack off, jump again, etc.
View
Training
Climbing is a power-to-weight activity. World class climbers generally have less than 2 pounds of body weight per inch of height. (For example, if you're 70 inches tall (5-foot- 10), you would weigh less than 140 pounds.) Since achieving this weight is difficult for most of us, here are a few tips for hill climbing. If you'd like to learn a little more about the energy requirements of climbing, go to Effects of a hill on Energy Needs for Cycling at (http://www.cptips.com/spdvshl.htm)
View
Nutrition
The meal before a ride should be low in fat and with no big lumps of protein. Both will tie up body resources in digestion, resources which are really needed for powering your legs. Also, cut down on fiber, which will absorb water and sit in your stomach. This is the only time where you don't want fiber in your system.
View
Aches & Pains
Numbness or burning of the feet is most commonlu causes by compression of the nerves between the metatarsals (small bones under the ball of the foot). The most common causes are: tight shoes, road vibration, too much climbing (which puts continuous pressure on the bottom of the foot) Riders with high arches or who overpronate are at risk as they experience more pressure on the ball of the foot.
View
Equipment
Info on bicycle helmets, standards, laws, more.
View
Nutrition

Most endurance athletes use high-intensity training to prepare for competitions. In this review we consider the effects of high-intensity interval and resistance training on endurance performance and related physiological measures of competitive endurance athletes.

Endurance in relation to athletic performance has been defined in various ways. In this article we have reviewed effects of high-intensity training not only on athletic endurance performance but also on underlying changes in the aerobic energy system. Endurance for our purposes therefore refers to sustained high-intensity events powered mainly by aerobic metabolism. Such events last ~30 s or more (Greenhaff and Timmons, 1998).

Training for endurance athletes generally emphasizes participation in long-duration low- or moderate-intensity exercise during the base or preparation phase of the season, with the inclusion of shorter-duration high-intensity efforts as the competitive phase approaches. The effects of low- to moderate-intensity endurance training on aerobic fitness are well documented

View
Aches & Pains
Knee and hip pain are the most common cycling injuries. The most common cause of knee (and hip pain) in cyclists is iliotibial band (IT band) syndrome. The IT band is a thick fibrous band of tissue, which runs on the outside of the leg from the hip to the knee. Pain is caused when the band becomes tight and rubs over the bony prominences of the hip (greater trochanter) and/or the knee (lateral epicondyle). Tight inflexible lower extremity muscles may worsen the condition.
View
Training
Interval training involves repeated periods of intense physical activity (the exercise interval) alternating with periods of recovery (the relaxation interval).

The relaxation interval avoids significant lactic acid build up and, as a result, allows longer training time at peak performance levels.

One study (in runners) pointed out that continuous, maximal performance could be sustained for only 0.8 miles (to exhaustion) while a similar level of exertion could be maintained for a total of over 4 miles when the training session consisted of intervals. But the down side is that training program drop out rates double when intervals are used.
View
Nutrition
Eating and drinking set the limits on how far and fast you can ride your bicycle. The Ultra Marathon Cycling Association can help you learn what food and drink will help you reach your goals!
View
Aches & Pains
Achilles Tendon, Ankles, Back, Bottom, Feet, Fingers, Genitals, Hands, Knees, Neck, Shoulders, Thighs, Wrists sample from web site:The Achilles tendons are the tendons at the back of the ankle, connecting the calf muscle to the heel. If you have pain in these tendons, it usually indicates a problem in pedaling technique. Achilles tendon problems often result from "ankling" during the pedal stroke. This is occasionally related to having the saddle set too high, forcing the cyclist to point the toes excessively to reach the bottom of the pedal swing. Having your cleats set too far forward, or otherwise pedaling with the toes. The farther forward the contact between the foot and the pedal, the greater the stress on the Achilles tendons.
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11-17  Next  Last       Records 1 to 20 of 337     
Page Size 

 

 ©2011 The Bicycle Site. All rights reserved.