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Training
A yoga program can build a cyclist's strength and endurance and introduce flexibility to chronically tight muscles. By Baron Baptiste and Kathleen Finn Mendola
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Aches & Pains
ntianxiety Treatment May Help Some Asthma Patients June 1, 2005 -- People with asthmaasthma are more likely to suffer frequent panic attacks, a new study shows. Government researchers who conducted the study say the finding that asthma and panic disorderpanic disorder often occur together could have important implications for asthma treatment.
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Repair & Maintenance
As you know, a person riding a bicycle is the most efficient animal on earth in terms of travel for energy expended. We are also the most efficient machines by the same criteria. To attain that efficiency, bicycles must be a compromise of weight and expense. Therefore they are fragile and need frequent adjustments. A bike tune-up is the package of small repairs and adjustments which are applied from time to time to keep your bike in top shape. Why pay the bike shop $30 or more every time your bike needs a tune-up, when with just a little reading and practice you can do a better, more caring job? Why pay them to have all the fun?
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Riding & Safety
here you are, riding along, happy as a clam in cold mud. And suddenly, you encounter a dog. What should you do?
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Training
The hardest part of bike racing isn't cornering, climbing or pack sprints. The biggest obstacle is the anxiety that everyone feels before they pin on that first number and roll up to the starting line. You'll feel a little better once the race starts and a lot better when it's over. The next race will be easier because you'll know what to expect.
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Riding & Safety
Pre-ride or Walk the Race Course Replace What You Burn Watch the Other Races
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Training
Come prepared: When you arrive at a race, your bike should be in race-ready condition. Don't save repairs or adjustments until the night before the race. Every racer should bring a variety of spare parts including: cog sets and chain rings, spare chains, spare tubes and tires, as well as an extra wheel set. Factory technical support is sometimes available but (don't ?) depend on them. Be Prepared.
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Training
When racing, it is helpful to make a strategy according to the length and style of the race (short sprinty, downhill, enduro). Strategies should be simple, and custom made for each race. Take into account: the terrain, weather, distance, your fitness, and your competitors. Your plan should be made early race day and at the site of the race. Having a bicycle computer is handy for making your plan more exact, but don't become predisposed with your speedo or you will hit a tree for sure. An example of a strategy I have used is :
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Riding & Safety
Thousands of miles of dirt trails have been closed to mountain bicyclists. The irresponsible riding habits of a few riders have been a factor. Do your part to maintain trail access by observing the following rules of the trail, formulated by IMBA, the International Mountain Bicycling Association. IMBA's mission is to promote environmentally sound and socially responsible mountain bicycling. Off-Road Rules of the Trail curtosy IMBA (International Mounain Bike Association). Graphics copyright Curt Evans.
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Nutrition
One often hears the question " I'm riding an ultra distance event (more than a century). Should I consider a liquid nutrition product for all my energy needs (e.g., Spiz, Perpetuem, Boost, Ensure, or should I eat a combination with solid food, too? There are several pieces to this answer.
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Nutrition
The secret for maximum performance in events lasting more than 2 hours (the time at which muscle glycogen depletion generally occurs with cycling) is to snack frequently every 20 to 30 minutes. A successful program requires striking a balance between eating enough to prevent hunger and avoiding the pitfall of "if a little is good, a lot is better" philosophy with the risk of stomach distention, bloating, nausea, and a subsequent deterioration in performance if one errs on the side of eating too much.
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Training
Ask a cyclist about their training program and you will hear about mileage, intervals, and nutritional secrets. Only recently has post ride recovery made it onto the list of priorities. Yet successful cyclists know that preparation for the next ride begins even as the current one is being completed.
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Training
There are two approaches to the relationship of aging and physical performance. Most athletes are concerned with the effects of aging on their own abilities to perform and compete. But for the nonathlete, the question is often whether physical activity can counteract or blunt the aging process itself. From that perspective, the answer is yes it can, and it has been estimated that 30% of all deaths from heart disease, diabetes, and colon cancer are related to inadequate physical activity. One study indicated that no more than 20% (and more likely less than 10%) of adults in the US obtain sufficient regular physical activity to have a measurable impact on their health and fitness levels.
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Training
It’s interesting to speculate whether it is genetics or training/attitude that determine who will be a world class cyclist. I put the following question (from one of this websire’s readers) to an online coaching forum and will summarize the answers below.
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Training
Random training produces random results: You may get faster, you may get slower, or you may make no progress at all. In order to increase your fitness level a few basic and key elements need to be in place. These elements are crucial to your athletic success and should be considered in designing your plan.
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Equipment
Transporting a bike by car is a relatively easy affair-just strap a bike rack onto the back of you're car, and you're ready to go. But, enter the world of air and rail travel, and things get a bit trickier. Read on to learn what you'll need to know to get your bike to your destination in one piece-or at least the same number of pieces you started with.
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Equipment
Welcome to cyclingnews.com's section devoted to everything else bike related other than the rider. Frames, wheels, groupsets, saddles, handlebars, pedals, tyres, helmets, clothing, shoes, glasses, accessories - you name it, we'll cover it. In the following reports, the latest innovations in the bicycling industry are described, with plenty of pictures of beautiful machines to drool over.
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Equipment
Here are a few sites on bicycle aerodynamics. As far as I can tell, I've found most which appear on the net. I've also tossed in a few links on Eddy Merckx, Lance Armstrong, and, of course, the official Tour de France homepage. As always, I'm looking for more sites in this area. Drop me a line with your suggestions or comments.
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Equipment
Incorrect quick-release use is dangerous because these mechanisms hold the wheels in place. The most common mistake is simply turning the lever like a nut until the wheel seems tight.
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Basics
Afraid to remove your rear wheel to fit the bike in a trunk or fix a flat? Think you’ll mess up the chain or shifting? Relax. Anyone can remove a rear wheel and it won’t affect shifting or the chain. Here’s how:
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