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Riding & Safety
f you go for a drive tonight, you'll see reflectors shining brightly from mailboxes. You'll see reflectorized stop signs. If bike riders are out, you'll see their pedal reflectors . All these reflectors will appear bright, and very easy to avoid. So here's the seven million dollar question: If all these reflectors are so darn bright and easy to see, how come the bike safety nerds insist you need active lights to be seen at night?
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Riding & Safety
Should I sit or stand on climbs? How can I get in shape for a long tour? Will extra protein help my riding? How can I lose fat and get faster? What can I do to be safer in a pack? and more
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Basics
These articles cover key topics for roadies. Learn from them, and use them any way you'd like. You may reprint them free of charge in your newsletter, website, book, magazine or letters to loved ones.
The Crucial First Ride...How to Solve Saddle Sores...How to Solve Painful 'Hot Foot'...How to Choose Cycling Shorts...How to Find a 'Safe Saddle'...How to Choose a Bike Club...How to Hold Your Own on Fast Club Rides...How to Survive Road Hazards...How to Deal with Bad Dogs...How to Perfect Your Position & Technique...How to Hydrate for Better Performance...How to Eat for Endurance...Three Essential Techniques for Roadies...Three Advanced Techniques for Roadies...How to Ride in a Group...Sports Medicine Tips from an Expert...How to Find Time for Cycling...How to Ride in a Paceline
 
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Aches & Pains
A warm, humid crotch and lots of pedaling can lead to skin problems, including the classic saddle sore, in all its throbbing, raging glory. Cycling dermatologist and Rivendell member, Bernie Burton tells us why they happen, how to avoid them, and if you don't pay attention, how to get rid of them.
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Aches & Pains
OK, let's cut through casual conversation and get to what everyone wants to know, but most are too embarrassed to ask: I want the tried and true prevention and remedies for saddle sores!
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Site
Several thousand pages on fixed gear bikes.
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Riding & Safety
The first thing I should say is: the most important thing is to keep all parts of your body warm. Usually when we're outside, we put on a thick jacket, maybe a hat, and we can either put on gloves or put our hands in our pockets, and we're fine for walking to classes or work. We don't worry about our legs or face, and our regular shoes are usually fine for our feet. When you go out riding, you find three things: (1) what you wear on your chest (the thick jacket) is too heavy, and you end up sweating like crazy, (2) what you wear on the rest of body is insufficient, and (3) since you're really exposed to the air, keeping the wind off you becomes very important.
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Equipment
This is meant to be a guide for the sort of things you should look for if you're buying a bike for a woman, whether it's a "women's specific bike" or not. It covers all kinds of bikes, whether for on-road or off-road use.
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Equipment
This is a guideline for a buying a mountain bike. I consider both off-road riding and riding on paved surfaces. It doesn't suggest any particular bikes, but instead explains what you should be looking for, and it will allow you to choose a bike in your price range that is good quality, appropriate for the kind of riding you want to do, and fits you correctly.
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Training
A century, or 100 mile ride, is a big goal for many cyclists. I've been riding recreationally since I was a teenager, and I was 28 before I did over 100 miles in one day. Since then I've done quite a few of them, including a double century, so I've pretty much gotten to the point of considering a century just a long ride. So here's some advice for people who want to do their first one.
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Riding & Safety
The title of this article is partly a joke, but the fact is that each bike has taught me a great deal, or I have learned alot through riding it and modifying it. I had quite a few one-speed bikes before buying my first multi-gear bike. These taught me the joy of riding, of going significant distances under my own power.
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Riding & Safety
Me at 39 weeks pregnant. This photo is a bit of a cheat, as I actually stopped cycling at 37 weeks. I had my first baby, Ellen, in March 2003. I continued to cycle until I was 37 weeks pregnant. The only reason I stopped was because my hands hurt too much as a result of pregnancy-induced carpal tunnel syndrome. Here are my experiences.
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Aches & Pains
This may not seem very related to cycling, but for me it was. When I got hit with RSI in 1996 it kept me off my bike for a few months. Ever so gradually over the years I recovered, having lots of setbacks, and only now am I beginning to get back to the way I was before to 1996.
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Basics
How to examine your current gearing and decide on what changes (if any) you would like. This is kind of a long lesson. Split it up and do pieces as your schedule allows. Feel free to ask questions. I am at rox@cyclingsite.com Before you begin this lesson you need to count the teeth on each gear both front and rear on your bike. Write this info down and save it for the lesson.
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Equipment
You have several options... Little mirror spot that mounts on your glasses eyeglass - I am not sure if these are removable and since I wear my glasses year round for everything (they are also my sunglasses) I have not tried this.
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Basics
First off, those "little cage things" _are_ toe clips. They're better than a sharp stick in the eye, and they work reasonably well with sneakers or street shoes, but they're most effective when coupled with cleated cycling shoes. Unfortunately, they only REALLY work well with said cleated shoes when cinched down tight, and then they can be tough to get free of when you really need to (emergency stops, or even normal stops when you've forgotten to loosen them and you're about to fall down in front of a line of stopped cars... Can you hear the voice of experience here?).
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Riding & Safety
Note: The following info is handy to know even if you have no intention of drafting or participating in a paceline.
Drafting – Following another cyclist closely so you are in the air pocket behind them. If you experiment following behind someone you trust you can actually feel this effect. You can even be a few feet back and get some effect. You should ask before doing this as some people do not like being followed this close.
Pacelines – Several people drafting each other and taking turns in front. This requires concentration, precision, and good communication or you end up with a chain reaction accident. However, it is faster and easier riding.
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Basics
Pumping road bike tires to proper inflation is work.
The piece I am missing here is if you are talking having trouble with a floor model pump or one you use on the road?
If you are talking a home unit (floor pump) there are a lot of models out there that work well.
They have recently re-designed them to feature their gauge at the top of the barrel where they are easy to read.
Expect to spend 40 to 60 bucks here, but a good floor pump should last for years. Many models have rebuild kits available to extend their lifespan.
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Equipment
These tips are intended for bike commuters (especially novice commuters), not racers or mountain bikers. Upright bicycles are really not good for your body -- they place a lot of stress on various parts of your body. If you're riding for an hour or less at a time on a properly-fitted bike, you probably won't be riding for long enough for that to matter. But if you're riding for longer periods of time, or if you're older, or if you're concerned by recent reports of damage to private parts by cycling, then you should consider getting a recliner bike. The tips below are for upright bikes.
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Riding & Safety
It's often said that hearing is the bicyclist's second most important sense, after sight. Well, not exactly. The sense of balance, the sense of touch and the kinesthetic, proprioceptive sense (sense of body positioning), make it possible to ride a bicycle even with your eyes closed.
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