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Nutrition
From Bicycling Science by Frank Whitt and David Wilson, p.157
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Nutrition
I was wondering if you knew the relationship between speed and effort for a given gradient. Obviously, when climbing you are using most of your effort to overcome the force of gravity.
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Training
By Dirk Friel, UltraFit.com, July 17, 2002. One of the biggest concerns I hear from road racers is how to improve hill-climbing ability. In fact, many times this is the sole reason cyclists seek out a coach for expert advice.
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Equipment
By Lennard Zinn
There seems to be a general consensus that long cranks offer a rider more power, though too long and a rider risks knee damage and hurts his or her spin.
Many suggest short cranks to allow for a nice spin, but too short and the rider loses power.
Now, if you ask 10 riders what constitutes "too long" and "too short," you'll probably get at least 10 different opinions.
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Equipment
A simple change in tire pressure can have a profound impact on the performance of a bike. Rolling resistance, traction, reliability and the feel of the ride can be transformed by changing the pressure by as little as ten pounds per square inch.
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Aches & Pains
A broken bone is a possibility if extreme pain is reported at the site of the injury, which is increased by any movement, with the casualty losing normal use of the extremity. As the broken limb is seldom life-threatening in itself, the most important step is to ensure that the patient is free from further harm, and has good resipration and pulse before proceeding to immobalise or move the patient. Also, treat for any profuse bleeding first. Symptoms, in addition to pain and the loss of normal functioning of the extremity, include swelling and later bruising, an apparant deformation of the body part when compared to its opposite, and shock setting in.
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Equipment
Samples:
Wheelbuilding: Building wheels from scratch is the best way to learn the craft of wheel truing, to get the feel for how a wheel responds to spoke adjustments. It is much easier to learn this with new, un-damaged parts than to start right in trying to repair damaged wheels.

Servicing Cup and Cone Hubs: This article examines the workings of conventional bicycle hubs and explains the tools and techniques involved in servicing them.

Tire Sizing: Bicycle tires come in a bewildering variety of sizes. To make matters worse, in the early days of cycling, every country that manufactured bicycles developed its own system of marking the sizes. These different national sizing schemes created a situation in which the same size tire would be known by different numbers in different countries.
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Nutrition
Although water does not provide Calories, adequate fluid intake and hydration is at least as important as Calorie replacement in maximizing your athletic performance. The single biggest mistake of many athletes is their failure to replace their fluid losses during training and competitive events. And this is especially true in cycling where evaporative losses are significant and can go unnoticed even though sweat production and loss through the lungs can easily exceed 2 quarts per hour. To maximize your performance, it is essential that fluid replacement begin early and continue throughout a ride. A South African study comparing two groups of cyclists (one rehydrating, the other not) exercising at 90% of their maximum demonstrated a measureable difference in physical performance as early as 15 minutes into the ride.
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Training
"The secret to long-distance cycling is to eliminate as many of the show-stoppers as possible, the things that force you to stop riding before you reach your goal." by Warren McNaughton & John Hughes
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Training
Whether you are a new bicycle century rider or a veteran century cyclist, these articles on training, equipment and nutrition will help you enjoy century rides! -- A series of articles.
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Basics
First two: # Road bike sizing is very easy: As a general rule, take your pants inseam length, convert inches to centimeters by multiplying by 2.54, then multiply that number by 0.7. Round to the nearest cm. That's the size that should fit you fine. -- Anne To remove the slotted screws in Look cleats when they've become too worn for a screwdriver to turn, use a Dremel moto-tool equipped with a cut-off wheel. Just spin it up (while wearing eye protection), and the wheel will allow you to deepen worn screw slots. After this, it's a snap to properly (and safely!) unseat the screws. -- Ken T.
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Equipment
Riding a normal, single-rider bicycle is a very rewarding experience, but a tandem bicycle adds a whole new dimension to cycling. Different tandemists choose the long bike for different reasons:
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Equipment
The mountain bike has revolutionized the solo bicycle market, but what are the implications of mountain-bike technology for the tandem market? Do mountain tandems make sense, and if so, for whom?
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Nutrition
As little as 2% dehydration adversely affects performance[1]. But as little as 2% overhydration can cause life-threatening hyponatremia[2]. Clearly, you need to get your hydration needs just right. Hydration must be coupled with adequate sodium intake; sodium losses can be significant during prolonged exercise[3,4]. Barr et al[3] observed an average loss of 12 g salt in six hours of cycling at 86 degrees F and 30% relative humidity (2 g more than the average US daily intake of 10 g).
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Equipment
by William Hudson. What do the following have in common: a derailleur gear, an aluminum frame, the freewheel, disk wheels, anatomical saddles, clipless pedals, suspension, folding bikes? Answer: they were all ideas that originated in the late 1800s.
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Equipment
A bicycle, or bike, is a pedal-driven land vehicle with two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other. First introduced in 19th-century Europe, it evolved quickly into its current design.
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Riding & Safety
Thousands of miles of dirt trails have been closed to mountain bicyclists. The irresponsible riding habits of a few riders have been a factor. Do your part to maintain trail access by observing the following rules of the trail, formulated by IMBA, the Internationa
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Riding & Safety
Even though mountain bikes have been shown to have less impact on trails than do horses, they do have some impact, and on trails that are heavily used, this impact has become significant. I see five main problems:
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Riding & Safety
It takes more than one person to cause a conflict, so I have ideas for ALL trail users to help decrease the severity and amount of conflicts on multi-use trails and fire roads. The first thing that we must do is check our attitudes. We must not judge others who use the trail. Regardless of the manner in which they use the trail, they are basically out there to enjoy nature and to enjoy their sport, whether it be hiking, backpacking, horse riding, or mountain biking. These forms of trail use have been shown to be similar in impact, and are all valid ways in which people enjoy natural areas. Restricting any one group is a form of discrimination.
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Riding & Safety
The Salt Lake Ranger District of the Wasatch-Cache National Forest has some guidelines for trail riding in their district. Here they are:
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